Working together to prevent child abuse

A few years ago, residents of the Mat-Su Borough identified child abuse and neglect as one of the area's major problems. In response community organizations teamed up with government agencies, schools and judges to develop a comprehensive solution and build connections throughout the region. LISTEN HERE

Drawing on historical strengths to prevent problems in the future

When rural Alaska makes the headlines, the focus is often on things like suicide rates, alcohol use, and trauma. But one project in southwest Alaska shifts attention to strengths instead. Qungasvik was developed by Yup'ik people, for Yup'ik people and is proving to be an effective way to help youth in parts of southwest Alaska thrive.

Kiana youth turn boring meetings into lifelong skills

Young people make all of the decisions to put together a multi-day conference in Kiana. Though some of the meetings for OPT In Kiana may not seem fun, they have lifelong effects on the young people and their abilities to face challenges.

Community in Unity: Youth Perspectives

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What’s it like to be a young person today? What challenges do they face? What are their visions for the future? Join us for an open conversation led by and featuring Alaska youth, and hear their perspectives on building strong, trusting, supportive communities. LISTEN HERE

To teach about racism, start with the basics

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Confronting racism and discrimination can be hard. The solution? Start learning techniques when you are young. In parts of Anchorage, some of the teachers of these difficult lessons are other young people, but they start with the basics.

What’s it like to be bullied – and how do we stop it

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Bullying is prevalent in Alaska -- about a quarter of teens say they've experienced it at school. Others have been bullied online. But why should we be concerned? How does bullying affect young people? Listen Here

Letting youth run the court to give their peers a second chance

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When a young person commits a minor offense for the first time, like vandalism or petty theft, they sometimes have a choice. They can either be charged by the standard juvenile justice system and potentially get an offense on their criminal records, or they can go to youth court.