Tag: Alaska Economic Report

How do mushers afford the Iditarod? Anja Radano says every year it’s a struggle.

Running the Iditarod takes months of preparation, training and a lot of money. While some mushers have major tour businesses and sponsors that help fund their kennels and pay for staff, Radano waits tables to help balance the big bills that come with being a dog musher.
Gov. Dunleavy stands behind a lectern next to a sign that says "relief for Alaskans"

How a rise in oil prices could impact this year’s PFD

With a recent rise in oil prices, the governor is again pushing for a higher PFD, plus an additional payment to boost last year's PFD. Legislators have other ideas.
A profile shot of a building.

Think you have supply chain woes? Try building in rural Alaska, where prices are high and the season is short.

Every step of the supply chain, from manufacturing to shipping to distribution, has lost any sense of a normal rhythm.

Alaska schools have long struggled to hire and keep teachers. The pandemic is making it worse.

The pandemic is making it even more difficult to hire and retain educators in Alaska. Strains from burnout and absenteeism are piling on the stress for a system that’s already buckling under the pressure.
Construction workers stand on a wooden platform with a stack of lumber next to them on a sunny day in the tundra

More tiny homes are coming to the Y-K Delta, thanks to pandemic relief funds. But are they a good idea?

A surge of new housing is coming to the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Most of those new units are slated to be of the trendy, tiny home variety. But with households in the region generally much larger than the national average, some tribes are questioning whether tiny homes are a good fit for the communities.

Anchorage retailers hope for spending rebound fueled by higher wages and ‘revenge shopping’

At Anchorage’s Dimond Mall, some retailers are reporting that sales have surpassed pre-pandemic levels thanks to pent-up demand and supply chain shortages that are vexing online shoppers.
A man stands behind and counter and in front of skis.

Supply chain bottlenecks are holding up winter gear in Anchorage

Across Anchorage, with snow covering the ground and temperatures dropping, waitlists for fat-tire bikes and skis are common. The demand for winter outdoor gear is high.
A white woman and a white teenage boy wearing hiking clothes and smiling on a mountain ridgeline.

Alaska’s vaccine sweepstakes aimed to get more people vaccinated. It’s unclear whether it worked.

The Alaska Chamber gave out nearly $1 million in a vaccine sweepstakes program, but it's unclear how effective the program has been at increasing Alaska's vaccination rate.
A square, beige heater.

Toyostoves are scarce this year. That’s bad news for keeping homes in rural Alaska warm.

Step into any home in rural Alaska and there’s a good chance that a Toyostove is what’s keeping it warm. Toyostoves are heaters that run efficiently on stove oil. But the supply of Toyostoves in Alaska is running low, and it’s yet another symptom of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Without citywide mask rules during COVID surge, Anchorage businesses feel the pressure

As COVID-19 case rates in Alaska continue to lead the nation, Alaska’s largest city has no municipal health measures like a mask mandate or gathering restrictions in place. That’s left businesses to navigate which prevention steps to take on their own, which can get complicated for owners trying to weigh the health risks of doing business.
a sign posted outside a restaurant reads "we are hiring"

Alaska’s economic recovery lags behind most states

As of July, Alaska had made up less than half of COVID-related job losses.

Alaskans have until Friday to apply for pandemic rental assistance

Renters who make 80% or less of area median income for their community are eligible for rental assistance until Friday, Oct. 1.

Federal eviction moratorium extended for nearly all of Alaska

The new moratorium only applies to areas experiencing “substantial” or “high” levels of COVID-19 transmission. That’s nearly all of Alaska right now.
A white woman with short hair wearing glasses in front of the ocean.

Federal child tax credit expected to cut child poverty in Alaska

An expanded federal tax credit for working families rolled out last week as part of the American Rescue Plan Act. Many have already seen their bank accounts credited $250 to $300 per child this month. It’s a plan that experts say will cut child poverty in half across the country — including in Alaska.

Consumer prices spiked more than 6 percent in urban Alaska over the last year

Anchorage has seen a consumer price increase of more than 6% in the last year, with some sectors rising by nearly 50%.
A woman in a black Tlingit-patterned robe beats on a drum and sings

‘Cruise ships are back, baby’: Alaska’s first large cruise ship in 21 months visits Ketchikan

The first large cruise ship to visit Alaska since 2019 arrived in Ketchikan early on the morning of July 9. The federally mandated test voyage is the symbolic start of the Alaska cruise season.

At Anchorage farm, refugees in Alaska gain training and economic opportunity

The Mountain View farm took the place of a vacant parking lot. Today it’s tended by more than 20 immigrant and refugee farmers who live in Anchorage.
A dog stands with its paws on a counter. A glass of beer sits on the counter.

Alaska’s brewing industry continues to grow, despite pandemic challenges

New breweries have been popping up in Alaska for years, and, despite earlier predictions that growth would plateau, it hasn’t let up yet. vv
A shelf with a few bozes of ammo

Ammo shortage leaves Alaska businesses shooting blanks

Alaska and the rest of the U.S. are deep in an ammunition shortage, likely due to a confluence of current events and production setbacks.

Independent travelers pour into Anchorage as summer tourism season begins

Big cruise ships recently got the green light to sail to the state again. At the same time, independent travelers are showing up in force in Southcentral.