Tag: AlaskaInsight

LISTEN: Can Alaska’s economy bounce back after COVID-19?

Tens of thousands unemployed, nearly $2 billion in lost state GDP, these are the economic projections in a new report by ISER examining the negative effects of the COVID-19 virus on Alaska’s economy. How much will federal spending help Alaskan businesses and individuals?
Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan take questions from reporters in the tunnel under the Capitol.

LISTEN: Congress put together a $2 trillion relief package. What happens next?

Congress has put together the largest financial relief package in history. Will it be enough to blunt the economic decline in the U.S? And what will it mean for Alaska's economy and workers?

LISTEN: As coronavirus shuts down schools across Alaska, educators are figuring out what happens next

Schools across the state are closed until at least March 30th. In a state that has low or no internet in some areas, how are districts working to meet the educational, nutritional and mental health needs of students?

LISTEN: How emergency officials and first responders are preparing for coronavirus

President Donald Trump declared a national emergency over the coronavirus pandemic. What does that mean for state emergency planners?

LISTEN: Gov. Mike Dunleavy returns to discuss resolving the state budget stalemate

Gov. Mike Dunleavy released his budget plan in December with a full permanent fund dividend and a $1.5 billion deficit for legislators to grapple with.
A picture of a large cardboard box and a pile vape pens in ziplock bags on a table.

LISTEN: To combat teen vaping in Alaska schools, educators and state officials work together

Teen vaping is a growing problem nationwide, with the CDC reporting that one in four students use vaping products. But what’s inside the liquid being vaporized? And how will it affect teenager’s health?

LISTEN: How serious is the novel coronavirus?

There are confirmed cases in the U.S. and a chartered flight evacuated Americans from China through the Anchorage airport before arriving in California. But how big should this concern be compared to annual influenza infections? Should countries shut down international travel?

LISTEN: How can we get more Alaskans teaching in their home communities?

The highest rates of teacher turnover in Alaska are with teachers who are trained outside the state. So how are educators and lawmakers working to get more Alaskans trained to teach in their home communities?

LISTEN: There’s a lot on the table during the next legislative session. State government reporters break down what to look out for.

Next Tuesday, legislators return to Juneau to start the 2020 session. Will the Dunleavy administration and state lawmakers find common ground on how to pay for state services and a permanent fund dividend without draining the Constitutional Budget Reserve?

LISTEN: Senate leadership is here to answer your questions ahead of the 2020 legislative session

Alaska Lawmakers will have a lot on their plates when they convene on January 21st for the start of the legislative session. How will they work to balance spending with less revenue coming in from oil and what amount will they agree to for a permanent fund dividend?

LISTEN: Spanish flu devastated rural Alaska in 1918. Are we better prepared for a pandemic 100 years later?

The 1918 viral pandemic known as the Spanish flu, killed millions worldwide and devastated rural communities in Alaska. 100 years later, what did pathologists learn from that outbreak and how prepared are we to handle a fast moving infectious disease today?

LISTEN: The Nov. 30 earthquake, one year later: what did we learn?

It's been a year since the largest earthquake to shake Alaska since 1964 hit the Southcentral region. Even with millions of dollars in destruction happening in seconds, no one was killed. Was it building codes, epicenter location or just luck?

LISTEN: What should the future of Alaska’s government look like? AFN has a few ideas.

The Alaska Federation of Natives annual convention theme last month was Good Government-Alaskan Driven. How does AFN leadership see their role in driving political change and how do they work with tribal leaders to accomplish it?

LISTEN: Southeast’s “extreme drought” is over, but there are still concerns about water conservation

Southeast communities are working to adapt to a problem they never imagined-- drought. This week on Talkf of Alaska we discuss community health, water conservation in a rainforest and the climate model forecasts for the future.

LISTEN: As the Arctic climate warms, the growing season lengthens. Will rural Alaska become more agricultural?

As winter approaches, farmers and gardeners make plans for spring crops. Climate change effects on the growing season in Alaska means new opportunities and challenges for the future. Will residents, even in the arctic, be able to grow enough food for their winter use?

LISTEN: 32 rural Alaska communities still lack running water. Infrastructure builders are trying to change that.

For most Americans, in home running water and flushing toilets are considered basic utilities, but across rural Alaska more than 30 villages are still living without piped systems. What are the challenges of providing water infrastructure to these communities?

A community discussion on immigration in Alaska | Alaska Insight Web Extra

Alaska is home to some of the most...

Despite contamination, state will continue using PFAS-linked firefighting foam

Local officials and the grassroots Gustavus PFAS Action Coalition have asked for contaminating foams to be removed from the local airport, but state officials say it's not that simple.

LISTEN: How lobbyists shape government in Alaska

Lobbyists are often viewed with skepticism. But many who lobby the local, state and federal government are citizens — often volunteers — who seek better healthcare, improved schools or advocate for policies that address local concerns over clean air and water.

LISTEN: Alaska’s history of immigration goes farther back than you might think

Immigrants play a large role in expanding the state's cultural identity, economy and community. But the road to citizenship is not easy, and arriving in Alaska is only half the battle.