Tag: Arctic Council

The Arctic in Action: Accomplishments of the Arctic Council as we Look to the Future

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Admiral Robert J. Papp, Jr., USCG (Ret.) will lead the effort to advance U.S. interests in the Arctic Region, with a focus on Arctic Ocean governance, climate change, economic, environmental, and security issues in the Arctic region as the United States holds the chairmanship of the Arctic Council from 2015-2017. LISTEN NOW

Is An Ambitious Arctic Agenda Economically Viable?

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An ambitious set of priorities has been put together for the American chairmanship of the Arctic Council that begins this year, but neither the federal government nor the state has much money to pay for implementing those priorities. Climate change is amplified in the Arctic, and the Arctic nations want to work together to respond. APRN: Tuesday, 2/6 at 10:00 a.m. Download Audio

The Arctic Council: Promoting Cooperation, Coordination & Interaction Among the Arctic States

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Thursday, August 25 @ 2:00 pm and 7:00 pm As trade and shipping routes open in the Arctic, oil exploration expands and questions of climate change arise, cooperation in the Arctic becomes increasingly more important. This week on Addressing Alaskans, learn more about the Arctic Council, the only intergovernmental forum devoted entirely to the Arctic.

Arctic Council Reports Record Temperatures Since 2005

A report out from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, of the Arctic Council, indicates that surface temperatures in the Arctic since 2005 have been higher than for any other five year period since records keeping began more than one hundred years ago.

Alaska News Nightly: June 17, 2011

Salazar Announces Acceleration of Lease Sale in NPR-A, Arctic Council Reports Record Temperatures Since 2005, Former Mayor of Sitka Ben Grussendorf Dies of Illness, Parnell Administration Optimistic About Gas Pipeline, and more...

Arctic’s Last Five Years Warmest Period on Record

A report out from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, of the Arctic Council, indicates that surface temperatures in the Arctic since 2005 have been higher than for any other five year period since records keeping began more than one hundred years ago.