Tag: climate change

Spruce beetles and climate change

The spruce beetle has changed the forests of southcentral Alaska, and it’s not done. On the next Outdoor Explorer, we’ll examine the forest changes driven by a warming climate. The most important factor has been these beetles. We’ll learn about their life cycle, impact, how to fight them, and what their explosion means for the places we recreate. We’ll also go deeper, learning what the best science predicts is next. Thanks for listening!

Potential health impacts of climate change in Alaska

It is the consensus of climate experts and 18 major American scientific associations that climate change and global warming is occurring at an unprecedented rate since the rise of humans and that it is due a “greenhouse” effect caused by a number of gases, the most important being man-made carbon dioxide. On this Line One program we discuss the potential health impacts of climate change in Alaska. Thanks for listening!

Ocean threats, a conversation with two authors

KSKA: Thursday, Nov. 02, at 2:00 p.m. Dramatic changes have happened in the ocean in southcentral Alaska in the last few years. What’s causing them? On this next Outdoor Explorer, we hear from two authors who have done studies and written on the impact of climate change on the marine environment, from increasing acidity to rising sea waters. LISTEN HERE

Climate effects in coastal and rural Alaska: two initiatives

The grim news headlines pound like heavy waves against a weakened coast line. Our warming climate hits rural communities hard. They have decisions to make: leave or stay and fight. Two initiatives will work to give them information to make those choices. LISTEN HERE

Climate change, health and the LEO Network in Alaska

Find out how the LEO Network gathers data on the changing environment from on-the-ground observers all over Alaska. Is there a role for you? LISTEN HERE

Sailing the Northwest Passage

KSKA: Thursday, Jan. 12, at 2:00 p.m. On Outdoor Explorer, we're fortunate to meet some of the world’s most amazing people, and that was especially true when Dario Schwoerer was in town to talk about his 100,000-mile sailboat voyage. On our next show we'll hear from Dario about his amazing family, some scary moments they've endured, and their hopes for our planet. LISTEN NOW

Ocean Acidification And How It Affects Alaska’s Fisheries

Shellfish are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification, and colder waters are becoming more acidic than warm waters. What does this mean for Alaska and its fisheries – especially crabs and oysters? Or for the food chain that feeds other species in the ocean? The answers are beginning to come in from the scientific world, and we’ll learn more about ocean acidification on the next Talk of Alaska. APRN: Tuesday, 2/17 at 10:00 a.m. Download Audio

As Alaska Warms, Climate Change An Awkward Subject For Lawmakers

When it comes to climate change, Alaska is seen as a bellwether. Temperatures have risen nearly 4 degrees over the past 50 years, double the national average. But even though Alaska figures in discussion of climate change nationally, it’s rarely a major topic of conversation in Juneau. Download Audio

Is An Ambitious Arctic Agenda Economically Viable?

An ambitious set of priorities has been put together for the American chairmanship of the Arctic Council that begins this year, but neither the federal government nor the state has much money to pay for implementing those priorities. Climate change is amplified in the Arctic, and the Arctic nations want to work together to respond. APRN: Tuesday, 2/6 at 10:00 a.m. Download Audio

Climate Change, Weather Variability Challenge Yukon Quest Personnel, Mushers

The Yukon Quest International Sled Dog race starts Saturday. For more than 30 years, the race course has followed an old Gold Rush era trail that took advantage of the frozen Yukon River. But recently, there have been places where the river hasn’t frozen up. That’s starting to raise question about the impacts of climate change on Alaska’s state sport. Download Audio

Subsistence and Climate Change

The changing climate is shifting seasons and wildlife habitat in Alaska, altering the plants, trees and berries on the landscape, and creating unfamiliar patterns in the ocean, with the location and abundance of fish and marine mammals. We’ll talk about how these changes are affecting the subsistence way of life practiced by Alaska Natives, whose traditions developed in a more stable ecosystem. KSKA: Thursday, Nov. 13, at 2:00 and 9:00 p.m. Listen now:

Scientists Use Satellites to Track Polar Bears

With sea ice in the Arctic melting, polar bears are in peril. Researchers have monitored the threatened species for decades, but tracking bears in remote and harsh climates can be costly and dangerous. Which is why federal scientists have started using a new tool to study the animal: satellites.

Invasive species could increase as climate warms

For the past few years Alaska has tried to eradicate its only known invasive aquatic plant: Elodea. The sturdy weed has taken root in a handful of the state's water bodies, threatening native birds, fish, and fauna. As ocean temperatures increase and icy days decrease, researchers worry it's only a matter of time before Elodea-and other invasive plants and animals-spread throughout Alaska. Download Audio

Video Collars Provide Polar Bears’ Point Of View

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are using new video collars to get a glimpse into the daily life of polar bears. Researchers have been using radio and GPS collars since the 1980s to track polar bears' movements along the Arctic sea ice. But, that data lacks a lot of contextual and observational information that allows for a better understanding of the bears. Download Audio

Government Seeks Delay on Seal Status Decision

The federal government is seeking a six-month delay for deciding whether two seals that depend on sea ice should be listed as a threatened species because of climate warming.

Ambassador Henry MacDonald

Suriname Ambassador to the U.N., Henry MacDonald's talk on "Climate Change: Forest Conservation in the Republic of Suriname and the Way Forward" was recorded at the Alaska World Affairs Council on December 2, 2011.

Arctic Scientist Under Investigation

A federal wildlife biologist whose observation in 2004 of presumably drowned polar bears in the Arctic helped to galvanize the global warming movement-- has been placed on administrative leave and is being investigated for scientific misconduct, possibly over the veracity of that article.

Alaska News Nightly: July 28, 2011

Arctic Scientist Under Investigation, Officials Hammer Out Details on U.S. Russia Polar Bear Treaty, UAF Researchers Unlocking Secret of Hibernation, Young Argues to Strip Park Service’s Power in Yukon Charley Preserve, and more...

Climate Change Shifting Southern Fish North

Alaska fishermen have noticed southern species moving into northern waters in recent years. Now research by American and Canadian fisheries biologists shows climate change is causing the same situation in the Pacific Northwest.

Alaska News Nightly: July 11, 2011

Shell Oil Permits Opposed by 19 Environmental Groups, Fuel Barge Runs Aground Near Dillingham, Substance Abuse Program for Pregnant Women Celebrates 20th Anniversary, Lighting Strikes Ignite Over 30 Fires, and more...