Tag: Community Health

Budget deadlock could delay Medicaid payments to health care providers

Health care advocates said nursing homes and behavioral health providers are among those who may not have large cash reserves to cover costs during a delay.

Ground broken at soon-to-be SEARHC hospital in Wrangell

Work has started on Wrangell’s new hospital. A tribal nonprofit health consortium is replacing the city-owned medical center that had been struggling financially.

Attorney General Barr says ‘very basics of public safety are lacking in the villages’

The visit to Western Alaska continues Barr's tour of the state, meeting with public officials and Alaska Native leaders to discuss public safety, the lack of law enforcement in rural communities and how the federal government can help.

Can ‘Indian country’ powers combat violence in rural Alaska? Sullivan says he’ll discuss it with AG Barr.

U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr is coming to Alaska this week. Sen. Dan Sullivan said he will focus on rural law enforcement, particularly for the more than 70 Alaska villages that have no police officers.

To get a count on bowhead whales, North Slope scientists head out onto the sea ice

“They’re just so graceful and beautiful. Every time I see a whale I get excited,” said biologist Craig George. “I’ve seen thousands and thousands. It’s always like seeing a bowhead for the first time.”

Climate change looks different in Southeast Alaska. Here’s how tribes are planning for that.

The Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska has a climate change adaptation plan. It wants the region to be included in the climate change discussion.

Aspiring to have a ‘live city again,’ Solomon moves forward on path to renewable energy

What used to be a fast-growing community during the gold rush in the early 1900s, the Village of Solomon is now only inhabited seasonally with no year-round residents. Located about 30 miles east of Nome, this community now seeks to return to its former status as a city.

In Utqiaġvik, learning about climate change includes studying your backyard

In Alaska’s northernmost town, eighth grade students study climate change in a way that encompasses the global picture, but pays particular attention to what’s going on in their own backyard.

What the healthcare overhaul at VA means for Alaska vets

The MISSION Act goes into effect on June 6th, and is intended to modernize veteran healthcare as a wave of younger vets are beginning to access services.

How a small, Arctic village found itself in the middle of Alaska’s new oil boom

Alaska is on the verge of a new oil boom -- and the village of Nuiqsut is right in the middle. Now the village faces tough choices. How do you maintain a way of life when the oil industry is knocking on your door?

Alaska lawmakers approve vaccine program continuation

Lawmakers have voted to extend the Alaska Vaccine Assessment Program, which provides universal

Emmonak votes to keep alcohol and remain ‘damp’

Voters in the Western Alaska community of Emmonak have narrowly decided to continue restricted alcohol sales and remain a so-called "damp" community under local option laws.

‘Ragin’ Contagion’ exercise tests Nome’s ability to respond to widespread disease

The fall of 2018 marked one hundred years since the Spanish flu hit Western Alaska, devastating Alaska Native populations and wiping out some villages in the region. This month, public health officials participated in a statewide exercise that tested how communities would respond if a similar widespread airborne disease happened today.

Melting ice is disrupting daily life in the Y-K Delta in the worst possible way

This spring has seen record-breaking warm temperatures across Alaska. In the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the Kuskokwim River is melting early — with devastating consequences.

EPA report shows increased chemical releases at Red Dog Mine, state pushes back

"Eighty six percent of all release quantities of TRI chemicals reported from region 10 are from the Red Dog Mine," says Alexandra Dunn, the EPA's Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

Proposed Medicaid cut raises concern for health centers, hospitals

Gov. Michael Dunleavy has proposed a $249 million cut to Alaska's Medicaid program, one of the most expensive parts of the state budget. Health care providers say cuts could mean services for Alaskans will look “dramatically different than they do today.”

Can Bethel afford the costs of climate change?

Alaska's temperatures are warming twice as fast as the global average, and rural Alaska is taking the brunt of the impacts. The costs from dealing with climate change are starting to become more visible in Bethel, a hub town for the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.

The complicated road to taking those last 12 steps

This is one woman's personal solution for problems it took her years to identify -- alcohol and substance misuse disorders. After a long journey and 12 steps, she began to heal -- and thrive.

How Alaska schools can help students dealing with trauma

In January, the state put out a new resource designed to help schools support students who have experienced trauma. It contains 11 chapters full of stories and best practices, created with input from over 200 teachers, counselors and community members across the state.

Southeast students explore careers to meet Alaska’s behavioral health needs

Alaska has a shortage of health care workers, especially in rural areas. Students from around Southeast came to Juneau to explore careers in behavioral health, a field that covers mental health and substance abuse.