Tag: Food Security

Tlingit potatoes continue to thrive thanks to Sitka Tribe, Forest Service

Historically, Tlingit people planted the tubers by the beach, at the forest’s edge, where there was ample sunlight and plenty of seaweed and fish gut fertilizer.

Bethel’s Meyers Farm shuts down market, focuses on internet sales

Tim Meyers says his Bethel farm was not selling enough produce in its store, and switching to produce boxes could be one way to reduce food waste.
A small community king salmon permit system is underway. (Photo by Shane Iverson / KYUK)

Nome summit focuses on food sovereignty in Alaska

Members of the Inuit Circumpolar Council discussed topics ranging from wildlife management to fisheries.
Dead seabirds lying on a beach near Nome

‘It’s starvation.’ Biologists in Alaska see a fifth year of significant seabird die-offs

According to the National Park Service, reports received by mid-August documented thousands of dead short-tailed shearwaters from Bristol Bay, and lower numbers of other types of birds, found deceased in the Northern Bering and Chukchi Seas. This marks the fifth year in a row Alaska has seen mass seabird mortality events.

NOAA declares unusual mortality event for Arctic ice seals

Since June 2018, NOAA has documented 282 dead seals in the Bering and Chukchi Seas, and close to 300 stranded seals.

Blue king crab fisheries in the Bering Sea are struggling

A recent report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric administration shows an Alaska crab stock was just added to the nation's overfished list.

Rising ocean temperatures intensify paralytic shellfish poisoning levels in Southeast waters

Over the last few months levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning in Southeast Alaskan shellfish have been very high. A coalition of tribal organizations is tracking PSP levels to make sure subsistence users can safely harvest shellfish.

In Arctic Village, Gwich’in leaders say the fight to stop drilling in the Arctic Refuge isn’t over

Until recently, Gwich'in tribes were on the winning side of battle over over drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Then, in late 2017, Congress opened the coastal plain to oil development So Gwich'in tribes are now taking unprecedented steps to try to protect the caribou herd they depend on.
Mayor of Akiak, Bobby Williams, reels in his net with his daughter Margaret. (Photo by Greg Kim, KYUK – Bethel)

Fishing regulations on the Kuskokwim: Do they restrict Yup’ik culture or preserve it?

The Kuskokwim River has now had three fishing openings for drift gillnets, but many people in Akiak are not happy. KYUK went fishing with the mayor of Akiak to find out more about why people’s nets aren’t as full as they want them.

Unusually high number of seal deaths reported along the coast of the Bering and Chukchi Seas

“We don’t know if it’s lack of sea ice, or if there was a harmful algal bloom,” said Julie Speegle with NOAA Fisheries. “There’s quite a range of factors.”

Could Arctic warming be behind gray whale deaths in Alaska, and elsewhere? Here’s why scientists are asking.

Scientists aren't calling climate change or declining sea ice the smoking gun yet. But they’ve seen enough other events that have come along with Arctic warming, like sea bird die-offs, that they’re asking questions.

As sea ice melts, fish are showing up farther north off Alaska. A federal fishing trip will investigate if they’re sticking around.

Two summers ago, federal scientists discovered something shocking: The Northern Bering Sea was teeming with cod and pollock. Those two commercially valuable species had never been found in such large huge numbers that far north.

Marine Highway cuts could mean trouble for aspiring Susitna Valley ranchers

In the Northern Susitna Valley, things like the Alaska Marine Highway System don’t often come high on the priority list, but for one family, cuts to the state’s ferry system could have a significant impact on their new business.

Using local foods, a Juneau middle school teacher demystifies cooking for kids

For kids who’ve never cooked, smoking their own salmon might seem out of reach. But a Juneau teacher believes it’s just another life skill his students can master — and he shows them how to do it.

In Utqiaġvik, temperatures are warmer, and the ice is changing. What does that mean for whalers?

“I think it was a little more stable, and there was a little bit more assurance that the ice you were on was not going to disintegrate on you that easy,” said whaling captain Gordon Brower.

Proposed agriculture funding cuts would hurt ‘state’s ability to feed itself,’ farmers say

Alaskan farmers say the state gets a big bang for the small buck the state provides to agriculture. That’s why they say big cuts like those proposed by Governor Mike Dunleavy would inflict serious, long-term harm to the industry.

Kodiak goat dairy faces an uncertain future amid proposed budget cuts

Governor Dunleavy’s proposed budget would eliminate the state’s only dairy inspector, making it nearly impossible for up-and-coming dairies like Kodiak Baptist Mission’s Heritage Farms to sell milk commercially.

What happened to Kachemak Bay shellfish?

Kachemak Bay was once abundant with crab, shrimp and other shellfish species. But by the early 1990s, populations hit rock bottom. Now a scientist and a college student are hoping to find out more about what happened.

Alaska lawmakers learn about a subsistence superfood

The state’s food safety codes currently don’t allow seal oil in public facilities like nursing homes. But a movement is underway to serve the beloved food to Elders.

Hatcheries the ‘canary in the coal mine’ as drought extends across Southeast Alaska

A drought declaration for parts of Southeast Alaska has expanded to include Sitka and Juneau. That means most of Alaska’s panhandle is officially in moderate to severe drought.