Tag: NOAA

Shellfish are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification, and colder waters are becoming more acidic than warm waters. What does this mean for Alaska and its fisheries – especially crabs and oysters? Or for the food chain that feeds other species in the ocean? The answers are beginning to come in from the scientific world, and we’ll learn more about ocean acidification on the next Talk of Alaska. APRN: Tuesday, 2/17 at 10:00 a.m. Download Audio

An ambitious set of priorities has been put together for the American chairmanship of the Arctic Council that begins this year, but neither the federal government nor the state has much money to pay for implementing those priorities. Climate change is amplified in the Arctic, and the Arctic nations want to work together to respond. APRN: Tuesday, 2/6 at 10:00 a.m. Download Audio

Originally titled "Arctic Shipping: Not If, But When?" the panel discussion was appropriately renamed to reflect increasing activity and the current presence of almost 100 vessels in the Arctic. "Over 95 vessels are operating in the U.S. Arctic right now", Margaret Spring of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration reported at the Arctic Imperative Summit. Are we ready? Listen to representatives from NOAA, Alyeska Pipeline and Marine Exchange of Alaska discuss "Arctic Shipping: Not If, But How Much?" on first of four Addressing Alaskans programs recorded at the Arctic Imperative Summit . KSKA: Thursday at 2:00 pm and 7:00 pm

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says U.S. and Russia researchers will begin the largest-ever survey of ice seals in the Bering Sea off Alaska’s west coast.

President Obama announced Friday a plan to shake up and streamline federal departments and agencies. As part of that, he wants to move the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or NOAA from under the Commerce Department to Interior.

The puzzling illness that’s affecting ringed seals in the Arctic is now officially an Unusual Mortality Event – or UME.

The federal government is seeking a six-month delay for deciding whether two seals that depend on sea ice should be listed as a threatened species because of climate warming.

Two of the three Killer Whales that swam far up the Nushagak River from Bristol Bay are dead. NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service confirmed the whales' deaths after reports from a local resident, Chris Carr of Portage Creek

Three Killer Whales, or Orcas have been spotted between the villages of Ekwok and New Stuyahok, about 60-70 river miles up the Nushagak River from Dillingham. Scientists from NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service say it is not unusual for the whales to head upriver after salmon, but it is odd that they’ve gone so far up this late in the season and that they’re lingering so long.

Coming up this week more money from the feds for fishery stock assessment is in the pipeline, Metlakatla's salmon fishery gets certified by the MSC, and NOAA Fisheries wants to hear your voice. All that, and studying how permits get dispersed among the fleet.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is calling for Oral history submissions from Alaska. It's for their project, 'Voices From The Fisheries'. NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service started the project back in 2007, but stories from Alaska have been slow to come in .

Governor Announces PFD Amount. Probe of Arctic Slope Native Corporation 8a Contract Requested by McCaskill. ACLU Wins Property Tax Case. Fairbanks Voters Consider Air Quality Ballot Proposition. State Wants Court to Force Ferry Builder to Replace Engines. Alaska Ship and Drydock Wins Ferry Contract. Cleveland Volcano Lava Dome Growing. NOAA Seeks Fisheries Histories from Alaska. Homer Looks for Homer Look Alike.

Conditions in the equatorial Pacific Ocean that gave Alaska its unusual summer this year are likely to persist into the winter.

NOAA Fisheries released the 2010 port rankings for seafood landings on Wednesday. Dutch Harbor-Unalaska is once again at the top of the list in terms of tonnage, with 515.2 million pounds crossing the docks. Reedville, Virginia was number two, 89-million pounds behind. Kodiak was number five, with 325.3 million pounds landed.

Friday, August 12 @ 2:30pm Coming up this week, those angry charter boat captains give NOAA's Jane Lubchenco an earful in Homer; Saint Paul's new boat harbor is ready for fishermen, and how many little fish does it take to make a big one?

It’s no secret that Homer charter captains are upset about NOAA’s new halibut catch-sharing proposal, which would mean a one-fish-per-angler rule in the Gulf of Alaska under most circumstances.

Jane Lubchenco, administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, is in the state this week, visiting Anchorage, Homer and Fairbanks.

The orangey goo that gunked up Kivalina’s shores earlier this month was first thought to be some kind of microscopic egg. But now, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers say it’s actually the spores of a plant fungus.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration spokesman Julie Speegle says the calf and its mother were spotted Wednesday morning by a charter fishing boat near Halibut Cove on Shelter Island. She says the five-person disentanglement team attached a transmitter to track the calf in case it raced away before they could free it.

Coming up this week: the fall chum run on the Yukon has started, and managers are expecting it to be strong; NOAA has a new plan to address the problem of the charter industry constantly exceeding their harvest limits; and the lessons learned from the ammonia leak at a Sitka cannery.