Tag: Rural Health Focus

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Explained: What are PFAS compounds and how can they affect human health?

As part of Alaska Public Media’s celebration of Black History Month Alaska Insight highlighted the life of the late Mahala Ashley Dickerson, who was a pioneer of law in Alaska. Dickerson is best know for winning an equal pay case against the University of Alaska Anchorage in 1975.

Tlingit potatoes continue to thrive thanks to Sitka Tribe, Forest Service

Historically, Tlingit people planted the tubers by the beach, at the forest’s edge, where there was ample sunlight and plenty of seaweed and fish gut fertilizer.

Bethel’s Meyers Farm shuts down market, focuses on internet sales

Tim Meyers says his Bethel farm was not selling enough produce in its store, and switching to produce boxes could be one way to reduce food waste.

Tribal Justice Summit renews focus on tribal courts in Western Alaska

Tribes from around the region met at Kawerak’s first Tribal Justice Summit in Nome to talk about what tribal justice could look like for them.

Wrangell moves forward on new water treatment plant

The new plant should be up in running in three years.

PHOTOS: Postcard from Red Devil

The town of Red Devil was built by mining almost 100 years ago, and now carries a toxic legacy of mine pollution. But to its residents, the Donlin Gold mine represents hope. Like so many communities in Alaska, resource extraction is at once a lifeline and a risk.

How do you rebuild a dying town in remote Alaska? Ask the 20 residents of Red Devil

This is the third of a three-part series reported from a village of 20 people on the Upper Kuskokwim River that stands to gain the most from the proposed Donlin Mine. Red Devil was built by mining almost 100 years ago, and now carries a toxic legacy of mine pollution. But to its residents, the Donlin Gold mine represents hope. Like so many communities in Alaska, resource extraction is at once a lifeline and a risk.

In Red Devil, an old mine’s pollution is not enough to doubt Donlin’s promise

This is part two of a three-part series reported from a village of 20 people on the Upper Kuskokwim River that stands to gain the most from the proposed Donlin Mine. Red Devil was built by mining almost 100 years ago, and now carries a toxic legacy of mine pollution. But to its residents, the Donlin Gold mine represents hope. Like so many communities in Alaska, resource extraction is at once a lifeline and a risk.

This old Alaska mining town is almost a ghost town. It has everything to gain from Donlin Mine.

This is part one of a three-part series reported from a village of 20 people on the Upper Kuskokwim River that stands to gain the most from the proposed Donlin Mine. Red Devil was built by mining almost 100 years ago, and now carries a toxic legacy of mine pollution. But to its residents, the Donlin Gold mine represents hope. Like so many communities in Alaska, resource extraction is at once a lifeline and a risk.

Running water is coming to all of Lower Kalskag

For residents, the infrastructure expansion means better health outcomes, less time spent hauling water and more time doing other things — like moose hunting.

Bristol Bay is outgrowing its wastewater infrastructure. Could a fish tax help fix it?

The controversial tax could generate about $3.5 million a year — but processors and fishermen say it would stress the industry even more.
nome catholic church

LISTEN: A reporter charted the harm caused by abusive priests in Alaska, a survivor lived through it

The legacy of sexual abuse perpetrated by Jesuit priests against Alaskans in rural villages has haunted families and communities for decades. An investigative series tracked some of the worst offenders from Alaska to a retirement compound outside of the state.

Extensive new report details cancer-causing PFAS toxins across Alaska

A group of environmental advocacy organizations says the extent of contamination and emerging research around PFAS constitutes a significant health concern for Alaskans.
Seldovia, AK. (Photo via KBBI - Homer)

Seldovia’s water supply returns to normal

While the city’s reservoir has returned to a healthy level, residents and businesses are still trying to repair the damage and plan for the future.
A small community king salmon permit system is underway. (Photo by Shane Iverson / KYUK)

Nome summit focuses on food sovereignty in Alaska

Members of the Inuit Circumpolar Council discussed topics ranging from wildlife management to fisheries.
Dead seabirds lying on a beach near Nome

‘It’s starvation.’ Biologists in Alaska see a fifth year of significant seabird die-offs

According to the National Park Service, reports received by mid-August documented thousands of dead short-tailed shearwaters from Bristol Bay, and lower numbers of other types of birds, found deceased in the Northern Bering and Chukchi Seas. This marks the fifth year in a row Alaska has seen mass seabird mortality events.

Study: As alcohol access increases in Bethel, so do demands on health and safety responders

The study examined more than a decade of data from law enforcement, health providers, state agencies and non-profits.

Cruise ships are coming to Nome through the Northwest Passage. Locals are excited — and wary

This has been Nome’s busiest cruise season to date, leaving some residents to wonder what that means for the future.

Nanwalek residents worry ‘if this is the future of no water’

The Kenai Peninsula village is one of six Alaska communities that have dealt with water shortages this summer, a season of record heat and dryness.

How does affordable energy and broadband affect community health?

Affordable energy and access to high-speed broadband is essential for engaging in modern commerce, education, telemedicine and for economic development initiatives. How is the rural energy infrastructure need being addressed?