Performing in an emergency

How and why do we react the way we do when we encounter a stressful situation in the
outdoors? This episode explores how the mind and body react to the unexpected surprise and emergencies. As a bear charges a group or an accident happens some people will perform correctly, some will become bewildered, and others will do exactly what they know they aren’t supposed to like run away. Our evolutionary history has much to do with how we react, but also the kind of training we practice helps shape our performance. Deb Ajango, the owner of Safety Ed and an Alaska Pacific University Faculty, joins us to discuss the psychological and physiological components of emergency response, and how to train to perform better in an emergency.

HOST: Paul Twardock

GUESTS:

  • Deb Ajango, the owner of Safety Ed and an Alaska Pacific University Faculty member

LINKS:

BROADCAST: Thursday, October 1st, 2020. 2:00 pm – 3:00 p.m. AKT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Thursday, October 1st, 2020. 8:00 – 9:00 p.m. AKT

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Eric Bork, Alaska Public Media
Eric Bork, or you can just call him “Bork” because everybody else does, was the Audio Media Content Producer for KSKA-FM. He now produces and edits episodes of Outdoor Explorer, the Alaska focused outdoors program. He also maintains the web posts for that show. You may have heard him filling in for Morning Edition or All Things Considered and can still find him operating the sound board for any of the live broadcast programs. After escaping the Detroit area when he was 18, Bork made it up to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where he earned a degree in Communications/Radio Broadcasting from Northern Michigan University. He spent time managing the college radio station, working for the local NPR affiliate and then in top 40 radio in Michigan before coming to Alaska to work his first few summers. After then moving to Chicago, it only took five years to convince him to move back to Alaska in 2010. When not involved in great radio programming he’s probably riding a bicycle, thinking about riding bicycles, dreaming about bikes, reading a book or planning the next place he’ll travel to. Only two continents left to conquer!