Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media

Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media
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After being told innumerable times that maybe she asked too many questions, Anne Hillman decided to pursue a career in journalism. She's reported from around Alaska since 2007 and briefly worked as a community radio journalism trainer in rural South Sudan. ahillman (at) alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8447  |  About Anne
Looking east on 5th Avenue at H Street in Downtown Anchorage.

What makes you want to stay in the community where you live? Is it easy to get around? Do you feel connected to your neighbors? Everything from building new playgrounds to giving people access to computers helps make a livable community.

Substance use disorders are diseases caused by many factors. Preventing and treating them requires input from everyone, not just law enforcement and health professionals. Those are some of the key messages in the state’s new opioid action plan. On Talk of Alaska we’ll discuss the plan and the ways you can be part of the solutions.

Karen Mitchell is the Behavioral Health Aide in Noatak, a small village in the Northwest Arctic. Twenty-five years ago, as she stared out the window of her home there, such a future seemed impossible.

Alexandria Niksik has been in and out of prison for seven years. Her most recent return home only lasted 16 days. But what might look like failure from the outside is actually a key step toward success and recovery from alcohol misuse.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy has announced Amanda Price, Nancy Dahlstrom and Kevin Clarkson as the newest additions to his cabinet.

Many organizations need help after the earthquake. Here are a few.

Childcare options in Anchorage are limited for families facing a week with no school.

When the earthquake struck, the 46 residents of Karluk Manor had nowhere safe to go until a church quickly opened their doors.

Tamara Josey was in her midtown cafe preparing for a catering event when the 7.0 earthquake struck Anchorage this morning. Her daughter was miles away with ceiling tiles tumbling down on her.

Anchorage emergency departments were open today, and all three major Anchorage facilities said they received patients with minor earthquake-related injuries.

Addressing issues of homelessness in Anchorage means improving the mental health care system.

The lead up to the holidays can be fun and exciting, but it can also be stressful and lonely. Financial pressure in the season of gifts and big meals can strain family budgets and what about those who are alone? On the next Talk of Alaska we'll hear from community members who help connect people to everything from food and housing to job assistance and friendship. Listen now

Being incarcerated is hard. So is being released. How are people from rural Alaska connecting with their communities and their cultures while in prison, and preparing for what’s next? Listen to a conversation at Anvil Mountain Correctional Center in Nome.

Solving community problems can be hard, unless you tap into the power of collaboration. This is how Chickaloon does it.

Fifty years ago, Alaska had a really big problem: it was hard to get medical care in small, rural communities. To solve it, the Indian Health Service worked with local governments and Congress to create the Community Health Aide Program. And it's still making communities healthier.

The Surgeon General spoke about his approach to ending the opioid epidemic and its root causes.

Today was the first day of school in Anchorage, and for the second year in a row, teachers are starting the year without a new contract. Listen now

A few years ago, residents of the Mat-Su Borough identified child abuse and neglect as one of the area's major problems. In response community organizations teamed up with government agencies, schools and judges to develop a comprehensive solution and build connections throughout the region. LISTEN HERE

Over the past few centuries in the United States, laws and policies have favored some racial and ethnic groups over others. It's led to racial inequity in Alaska and beyond. Now different groups are working together to educate people about these problems and develop solutions. LISTEN HERE

At Spring Creek Correctional Center, the prison store funds the clubs. The clubs fund the hobby shop. And the hobby shop creates an outlet for growth but only limited options for making money - right now.