Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media

Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media
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After being told innumerable times that maybe she asked too many questions, Anne Hillman decided to pursue a career in journalism. She's reported from around Alaska since 2007 and briefly worked as a community radio journalism trainer in rural South Sudan. ahillman (at) alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8447  |  About Anne

Anchorage has a plan to end homelessness, but its implementation is just beginning. As community leaders dig into the details of solving one of the city's toughest problems, getting everyone on the same page is bound to complicated. So they're starting with a conversation. But what do people who are experiencing homelessness say?

Most people who go to prison in Alaska will eventually be released. To be successful on the outside, they need to develop new skills and outlooks. But what's happening behind the walls to make that possible? Join us for a community conversation with inmates and staff at Spring Creek Correctional Center near Seward on Sept. 26 at 7 pm. LISTEN HERE

A closer look at steadfast, long-term solutions that lay the groundwork for housing development statewide with the executive director of the Alaska Coalition on Housing and Homelessness.

The school in Nikolai, until recently, had a problem. There was nowhere for the high school teacher to live. So they asked the students to build her a house.

The Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority has hired a new CEO almost a year after the ousting of its long-time leader. Listen now

The state's ombudsman's office says staff at Spring Creek Correctional Center violated the law in 2013 when they stripped 12 inmates and locked them naked in cold cells without clothing, blankets, or mattresses for up to 12 hours. The ombudsman made recommendations to rectify the situation in a report released last week. Listen now
Goose Creek Prison. Photo by Ellen Lockyer, KSKA - Anchorage.

In 2016, the state legislature passed Senate Bill 91 -- an omnibus criminal justice reform bill. Now, just over a year later, some are blaming the law for increases in crime and calling for its repeal. Join us for Talk of Alaska as we explore what SB 91 actually does, and what factors could be influencing crime rates in the state. Listen Here

The Department of Corrections is the largest mental health care provider in the state, and the administrators at Spring Creek Correctional Center want to make it one of the most effective, too. They’re treating inmates who have mental illnesses with new innovations, like "porches" and paintings.

How do you change who you are when you live in a world that constantly says you're bad? Take a lot of classes.
Goose Creek Prison. Photo by Ellen Lockyer, KSKA - Anchorage.

Almost everyone who goes to prison will eventually be released, but without the proper support network, many will likely re-offend. Organizations, individuals, and the Department of Corrections are trying to change that. Listen Here

Staying calm and taking responsibility are some of the keys to success both inside and outside of prison. But sometimes it takes more than a person to teach that. Meet the dogs of Wildwood Correctional Center in Kenai.

Today we're hearing from Carlos Godfrey of McGrath. Godfrey works for the National Weather Service and is based in Anchorage. Listen now

In Alaska, two-thirds of people who leave prison end up going back within three years. But former inmates who can find decent jobs within a year of release are half as likely to re-offend. So how does the Department of Corrections want to cut recidivism? By teaching the trades.

For most of the United States, the most effective way to get food to people who need it is through Food Stamps. But what happens if you live in a place where stores are limited and expensive? Subsistence doesn’t provide everything that people are accustomed to eating anymore. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has part of the solution through an alternative to SNAP for members of federally recognized tribes in rural areas of Alaska and on Indian Reservations.

This week we're hearing from Brittney Anderson in McGrath. Anderson moved to McGrath in January of 2016. Listen now

Researchers say one of the most effective ways to fight hunger nationwide is also one of the oldest: the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. It's still making sure fewer Alaskans go to bed hungry.

In the past month, the three top leaders at the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority submitted letters of resignation. Listen now

Droves of people flood the Kenai to dipnet each year, but does it pay? Given how much you spend on gear and gas, is it a viable solution for food insecurity? Some say yes.

Did you have enough to eat this month? Did your neighbor? About 15 percent of Alaskans are food insecure -- many of them are children or elderly. But there are ways to help solve this problem. Join us for Talk of Alaska as we discuss how. Listen Here

Summer meals programs for getting food to hungry kids don't work in rural areas, especially in Alaska. People in Talkeetna are overcoming that problem with the help of books, buses, and backpacks.