Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media

Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media
After being told innumerable times that maybe she asked too many questions, Anne Hillman decided to pursue a career in journalism. She's reported from around Alaska since 2007 and briefly worked as a community radio journalism trainer in rural South Sudan. ahillman (at) alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8447  |  About Anne

Suicide rates for Alaska Native youth are still high -- but groups are actively working to change that. Community members and researchers are focusing on the strengths of Alaska Native peoples and cultures to reduce the risk and promote wellness. Listen now

If someone breaks their arm or twists an ankle, we generally know what to do – brace it and get help. But what if someone is hurting mentally instead of physically? A bandage won’t help, but a Mental Health First Aid class will.

Alaska is still in recession- and the state's economic engine is significantly smaller than it was three years ago. But job losses have slowed.  So is there an end in sight for the first state recession in three decades? And what will it take to stage a real recovery? LISTEN HERE

This week we're hearing from Richard Hensley in Kotzebue. Hensley lives in an assisted living facility now, but used to live with his sister and brother-in-law. Listen now

The traditional foods movement in Alaska is growing. Moose and caribou are appearing on menus at healthcare facilities across the state. But there's an important food that still needs approval -- seal oil. A long-sought solution is in the works.

Politicians on both sides say we need to tap into the Permanent Fund in order to close the state's multi-billion dollar budget gap. But how would that draw on the $66 billion dollar fund be structured? And how might it affect the longevity of the state's largest investment account? LISTEN HERE

Traditional foods are healthier, but for a long time, federal regulations prevented elders in care facilities from accessing them. A team in Kotzebue worked to change that. Here's how.

Thousands of Alaskans have been homeless, but the number would be much higher if organizations and individuals didn't work to prevent it. On the next Talk of Alaska we're discussing solutions for preventing homelessness, and why it affects everyone in the state, not just the families who experience it. LISTEN HERE

Dion Wynne was hospitalized and couldn't work, but received enough help to keep his housing. His success isn't just important for his family -- it helps everyone. Now advocates are working to make the homeless prevention system less cumbersome.

Thousands of Alaskans seek rental assistance every year. Sometimes, preventing homelessness requires an act of faith.

Resources exist to help people on the verge of eviction, but how do you find them?

Dion Wynne was working full-time and preparing to open a therapeutic foster home. Then he fell ill and was hospitalized for over a month. Join him as he tries to save his home -- and his dreams.

The Clements raised their grandchildren in their cozy Alaska home, but Shirley's health problems were making it difficult to keep living there. Until now.

Many parts of Alaska lack enough accessible care for older people. It's a problem without a solution. But there are ways to prevent the problem in the first place. Exercise for elders.

What’s it like to be a young person today? What challenges do they face? What are their visions for the future? Join us for an open conversation led by and featuring Alaska youth, and hear their perspectives on building strong, trusting, supportive communities. LISTEN HERE

Aging in Alaska is both challenging and wonderful. The state's rapidly growing population of people who are 65 and older are strengthening their communities by contributing time and wisdom, and building the economy. On the next Talk of Alaska we'll hear from elders about what it's like to grow older here and what needs to happen to make that more feasible and fun. Listen Here

In the 1970s and early 80s people flooded Alaska looking for work in the oil industry and other fields. Now, 40 years later, many are still here. Instead of fleeing to warmer weather, Alaskans are aging in Alaska. For the past seven years, we’ve had the fastest growing senior population in the country. With it comes wisdom, economic growth, and a different set of needs. Can our state handle it?

Confronting racism and discrimination can be hard. The solution? Start learning techniques when you are young. In parts of Anchorage, some of the teachers of these difficult lessons are other young people, but they start with the basics.

Dean Williams, the commissioner of the Department of Corrections, acknowledges it's easy to access illegal drugs in prison in Alaska. He says his department is trying to stop it.

Bullying is prevalent in Alaska -- about a quarter of teens say they've experienced it at school. Others have been bullied online. But why should we be concerned? How does bullying affect young people? Listen Here