Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media

Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media
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After being told innumerable times that maybe she asked too many questions, Anne Hillman decided to pursue a career in journalism. She's reported from around Alaska since 2007 and briefly worked as a community radio journalism trainer in rural South Sudan. ahillman (at) alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8447  |  About Anne

Bullying is prevalent in Alaska -- about a quarter of teens say they've experienced it at school. Others have been bullied online. But why should we be concerned? How does bullying affect young people?

When a young person commits a minor offense for the first time, like vandalism or petty theft, they sometimes have a choice. They can either be charged by the standard juvenile justice system and potentially get an offense on their criminal records, or they can go to youth court.

Sometimes when young people are in rough situations, they don’t want to ask for help. Especially not from adults. That’s where peer outreach workers step in. Alaska Youth Advocates have been connecting with youth on the streets of Anchorage and helping them find resources for 25 years.

Being in foster care can be hard, and foster youth often turn to each other for support. Sometimes that leads to unexpected relationships.

Alaska has a housing shortage, and it's hard for many of the state's most vulnerable residents to find secure, stable places to live. Different organizations around Alaska are coming together to try to fill the gap, but it's going to require new types of collaboration. Listen Here

Cook Inlet Housing has developments across Anchorage, including a new 33-unit building in Spenard. In an area of town often better known for its colorful past, the developer is trying to use state-of-the-art modern housing to help promote the neighborhood's future. And it's working.

Anchorage has a plan to end homelessness, but its implementation is just beginning. As community leaders dig into the details of solving one of the city's toughest problems, getting everyone on the same page is bound to complicated. So they're starting with a conversation. But what do people who are experiencing homelessness say?

Most people who go to prison in Alaska will eventually be released. To be successful on the outside, they need to develop new skills and outlooks. But what's happening behind the walls to make that possible? Join us for a community conversation with inmates and staff at Spring Creek Correctional Center near Seward on Sept. 26 at 7 pm. LISTEN HERE

A closer look at steadfast, long-term solutions that lay the groundwork for housing development statewide with the executive director of the Alaska Coalition on Housing and Homelessness.

The school in Nikolai, until recently, had a problem. There was nowhere for the high school teacher to live. So they asked the students to build her a house.

The Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority has hired a new CEO almost a year after the ousting of its long-time leader. Listen now

The state's ombudsman's office says staff at Spring Creek Correctional Center violated the law in 2013 when they stripped 12 inmates and locked them naked in cold cells without clothing, blankets, or mattresses for up to 12 hours. The ombudsman made recommendations to rectify the situation in a report released last week. Listen now
Goose Creek Prison. Photo by Ellen Lockyer, KSKA - Anchorage.

In 2016, the state legislature passed Senate Bill 91 -- an omnibus criminal justice reform bill. Now, just over a year later, some are blaming the law for increases in crime and calling for its repeal. Join us for Talk of Alaska as we explore what SB 91 actually does, and what factors could be influencing crime rates in the state. Listen Here

The Department of Corrections is the largest mental health care provider in the state, and the administrators at Spring Creek Correctional Center want to make it one of the most effective, too. They’re treating inmates who have mental illnesses with new innovations, like "porches" and paintings.

How do you change who you are when you live in a world that constantly says you're bad? Take a lot of classes.
Goose Creek Prison. Photo by Ellen Lockyer, KSKA - Anchorage.

Almost everyone who goes to prison will eventually be released, but without the proper support network, many will likely re-offend. Organizations, individuals, and the Department of Corrections are trying to change that. Listen Here

Staying calm and taking responsibility are some of the keys to success both inside and outside of prison. But sometimes it takes more than a person to teach that. Meet the dogs of Wildwood Correctional Center in Kenai.

Today we're hearing from Carlos Godfrey of McGrath. Godfrey works for the National Weather Service and is based in Anchorage. Listen now

In Alaska, two-thirds of people who leave prison end up going back within three years. But former inmates who can find decent jobs within a year of release are half as likely to re-offend. So how does the Department of Corrections want to cut recidivism? By teaching the trades.

For most of the United States, the most effective way to get food to people who need it is through Food Stamps. But what happens if you live in a place where stores are limited and expensive? Subsistence doesn’t provide everything that people are accustomed to eating anymore. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has part of the solution through an alternative to SNAP for members of federally recognized tribes in rural areas of Alaska and on Indian Reservations.