Elizabeth Jenkins, Alaska's Energy Desk - Juneau

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Could climate change research in Alaska be put on ice?

The University of Alaska system is known as a leader in climate change research, studying melting permafrost to shrinking glaciers. But there’s growing uncertainty about the future of such projects with steep cuts to state funding.

How hospital ERs in Alaska are helping patients with opioid use disorder

A trip to the emergency room can be a crucial window to assist people in their recovery. Now some providers are giving patients a medicine to ease the transition so they can seek additional care. Recently, a hospital in Juneau completed one year of this program with encouraging results.

Alaska schools now have more guidance on how to teach science in the classroom

The Alaska State Board of Education unanimously approved new science standards on Friday, which are more detailed about topics like climate change and evolution than standards previously recommended for schools.

AK: Meet the Juneau couple who brush their teeth next to history

The Last Chance Mining Museum is celebrating 25 years of continuous operation. But for the Juneau couple who lives there, it’s been a permanent residence for longer than that.

This ice cream stand was constructed out of local wood. Here’s why that’s unique.

There are still questions about how to make the young growth timber industry viable in Southeast Alaska. But some customers are seeking out the material.

Climate change looks different in Southeast Alaska. Here’s how tribes are planning for that.

The Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska has a climate change adaptation plan. It wants the region to be included in the climate change discussion.

Two of Alaska’s biggest exports are caught up in the US-China trade dispute

As President Donald Trump’s trade dispute with China continues to drag out, some of Alaska’s biggest exports expect to be hit with even steeper tariffs than they’ve seen in recent months.

As the Lower 48 continues to dry out, Alaska could get wetter

This past winter, parts of Southeast Alaska experienced severe drought. But a new study published in the journal Nature suggests that’s probably not a preview of what’s to come in Alaska.

New legislation introduced in Congress aims to strengthen Roadless Rule

Under the proposed Roadless Area Conservation Act, the U.S. Department of Agriculture wouldn’t have the authority to grant an Alaska-specific exemption to the Roadless Rule.

Before, some teens in crisis had to leave their families in Juneau to get help. That’s changing.

Since January, Southeast Alaska’s largest hospital has quietly rolled out a new program to close a big gap in behavioral health services for minors. So far, it's provided care to more than a dozen young people in the midst of a crisis.

Caring for Alaska’s seniors during tense budget talks

Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s budget proposes eliminating more than a third of the state’s funding for Medicaid. To achieve that, some hospitals and nursing homes could be paid less to provide skilled labor.

Southeast Alaska researchers get rare opportunity to study a sperm whale

The species has been spotted in the Inside Passage before. But sightings are infrequent. A whale found recently near Juneau is thought to have died from a vessel strike.

Will Alaska endorse climate science education?

Alaska could be joining dozens of other states by adopting the framework of Next Generation Science Standards. On Friday, the State Board of Education unanimously approved a draft slated for public comment.

Alaska lawmakers learn about a subsistence superfood

The state’s food safety codes currently don’t allow seal oil in public facilities like nursing homes. But a movement is underway to serve the beloved food to Elders.

The Alaska Roadless Rule decision is moving along. Some tribal governments say it’s moving too fast.

The Organized Village of Kake says the timeline has felt rushed for a decision that could have a major impact on rural Southeast Alaska.

In Anchorage, emotionally preparing students for the scary prospect of climate change

“One of the reasons why I suspect other teachers might not want to jump into this, besides it being a political hot topic, is it’s heavy and it’s a real downer,” says science educator Bryan Smith.

In Sitka, a teacher wants her classroom to know who’s responsible for climate change

Some school districts don’t elaborate on the causes of climate change, while others make it clear: Humans are largely to blame. This week, we’re going inside two Alaska classrooms to learn how teachers and students are navigating these difficult conversations.

Of 140,000 comments, most favor keeping the Tongass Forest Roadless Rule

Back in August, the U.S. Forest Service said it would consider the state’s ask for an exemption that would make it easier to build new roads through the federal land.

Alaska’s latest climate policy is still offline. So these students made a delivery to the governor.

Shortly after Gov. Michael Dunleavy was sworn into office, the website with the state’s latest plan to address climate change went down. It was created with months of planning by a team appointed by former Gov. Bill Walker.

Forest Service reschedules meeting on Southeast Alaska timber sales

The agency worked on the project during the partial government shutdown, which drew sharp criticism from environmental groups.