Nathaniel Herz, Alaska's Energy Desk - Anchorage

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Could Arctic warming be behind gray whale deaths in Alaska, and elsewhere? Here’s why scientists are asking.

Scientists aren't calling climate change or declining sea ice the smoking gun yet. But they’ve seen enough other events that have come along with Arctic warming, like sea bird die-offs, that they’re asking questions.

A stretch of the Denali Park Road sits atop a creeping landslide. And it’s picking up speed.

Officials at Denali National Park and Preserve are studying whether the existing path of the park’s 92-mile road can be spared from a creeping landslide, in what scientists say could be a preview of Denali’s future as its permafrost thaws.

Federal researchers open formal investigation into gray whale deaths, including Alaska’s

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday that the 70 dead whales seen this year it constitutes an "unusual mortality event."

As sea ice melts, fish are showing up farther north off Alaska. A federal fishing trip will investigate if they’re sticking around.

Two summers ago, federal scientists discovered something shocking: The Northern Bering Sea was teeming with cod and pollock. Those two commercially valuable species had never been found in such large huge numbers that far north.

A judge blocked a Trump plan for a controversial road through an Alaska wildlife refuge. Now the administration is appealing.

Lawyers for the Trump administration are appealing a decision by federal judge Sharon Gleason that blocked a land exchange that was supposed to lead to construction of a road through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge on the Alaska Peninsula.

As gray whales die along the West Coast, Alaska scientists look for answers beneath blubber

Researchers are trying to determine the cause of a gray whale die-off along the West Coast, including Alaska. And they're looking at whether recent warming trends in the Arctic, and reduced sea ice, has affected their prey.

Ketchikan planes in mid-air crash both had equipment designed to help avert collisions. What went wrong?

How the planes' GPS transponders were or weren't working is a question investigators will explore, they said Wednesday.

Alaska lawmakers are trying to fight crime by toughening prison sentences. Not everyone agrees that will work.

People who work with released prisoners say the best way to combat crime is enhancing access to programs that target mental health problems and drug addiction -- not increasing prison terms.

Bob Penney spent more than $300,000 to get Gov. Dunleavy elected. Then his grandson got an $8,000-a-month no-bid contract.

Clark Penney's company, Penney Capital, was hired to help a Dunleavy administration initiative to bring new businesses to Alaska and expand existing ones. Officials justified the no-bid contract by citing its urgency and Penney's experience working with wealthy investors.

Big parts of Gov. Dunleavy’s agenda remain unfinished. But he still has time, tools at his disposal.

With the legislative session winding down, Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy has gotten traction with some of his ideas, but many others have stalled. The governor's office is still holding out for more, but his allies say Dunleavy can still declare victory without passage of specific bills or initiatives.

Dunleavy administration pick for $94,000-a-year labor relations manager comes without labor relations experience

Jared Goecker started as the state’s labor relations manager last month – a job that includes helping to supervise negotiation of union contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars. His boss said she interviewed several candidates for the job and that Goecker was the best fit.

An international airplane feud could crimp one of Alaska’s most lucrative fisheries

A new twist in a decade-long trade war over airplanes could crimp one of Alaska's most lucrative fisheries: The European Union is threatening new import taxes on Alaska pollock.

As Capitol reporters dwindle, Alaska lawmakers grapple with rise of political blogs

The newest member of the Alaska Capitol press corps isn't your average reporter -- he once made the news for posing for photos in a Speedo. But he's one of a growing number of political bloggers who are trying to fill in gaps left by Alaska's shrinking mainstream media.

As his crime bills languish, Gov. Dunleavy renews the idea of a special session

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy, at a news conference Monday, again suggested he could order Alaska lawmakers into a special session unless they start advancing his batch of criminal justice bills.

The special ingredient inside these new gluten-free noodles? Fish, from Alaska.

The featured ingredient in the new gluten-free “protein noodles” stocked at Costco might surprise you: It’s pollock, the unassuming whitefish caught by the millions in the Bering Sea, off Alaska’s coast.

Candidate Dunleavy said he had no plans to cut ferries, schools, university. Then Gov. Dunleavy proposed deep reductions.

Dunleavy’s shifting positions on state spending and budget cuts have left critics fuming; they argue that the governor was able to make dubious claims on the campaign trail that were never debunked by a weakened mainstream media, and that that might have changed the election's outcome.

Dunleavy says money set aside for Alaska schools is subject to veto. Lawmakers disagree.

A new fight is erupting in Juneau about spending on Alaska's public schools. It centers on whether Gov. Mike Dunleavy has the power to veto money state lawmakers set aside for schools last year, for the upcoming school year – a practice called "forward funding."

Alaska Gov. Dunleavy’s red veto pen looms over this year’s budget debate

In Alaska, the governor wields line-item veto power stronger than in all 49 other states. And the high bar to override such vetoes, combined with Mike Dunleavy’s desire for spending cuts, is drawing new attention this year to the constitutional power.

Former Gov. Bill Walker lands at political ally’s law firm

Former Alaska Gov. Bill Walker has a new job. Walker, an attorney, has joined the law office formerly known as Brena, Bell and Clarkson -- now known as Brena, Bell and Walker, according to a document filed Friday in a federal case.

Aboard Alaska’s endangered ferries, passengers fear a “giant step back in time”

Step onboard the MV LeConte, where a single trip last week showed how Southeast Alaska residents have knit the state's ferries into their lives – and how they would adapt if the ships stopped running, and Gov. Mike Dunleavy is proposing.